Project progress…and beyond

Prior to the JISC joint programme meeting this week, we are reflecting on the progress of our project, and thinking about what we hope to achieve in the project and beyond.

The main aim of the project is to make historic tide gauge data freely available. Why is this important? These data are unrepeatable scientific measurements and we want to encourage reuse of the data. Extending back and infilling tide gauge records will help with, among other things, climate change research, storm surge predictions and coastal land movement studies.

House of Commons archives (image taken from scsmith4′s Flickr photostream and used under Creative Commons)

House of Commons archives (image taken from scsmith4′s Flickr photostream and used under Creative Commons)

Through this project we also hope to reach a wider audience than our usual community, to raise awareness of BODC and help improve our impact. One of the results of this project is that through the Online Educational Resources (OERs) we are working on, we hope to embed our data in academic courses and ensure its reuse.

Thanks to the MEDIN pilot project we already have some historical tide gauge data ledger scans online. Last year (April 2011 – March 2012), we had 222 unique users accessing these historic scans. Prior to these data being made available online, we had 12 requests for analogue data over the past 5 years. This is a 9000% increase in requests per year.

We want to continue our work with sea level data archaeology past the end of this project. We will continue to work with the Global Sea Level Observing System (GLOSS) Group of Experts panel on data archaeology and the International Council for Science: Committee on Data for Science and Technology Data at Risk Task Group (DARTG) to try to save global sea level data. We are also looking at digitising the data in our ledgers through the possibility of a Citizen Science project. We also will work with university stakeholders to ensure our OERs meet their requirements, and embed our data and services within the academic system.

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